Author Appearance: Morowa Yejide Discussing “Time of the Locust”

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Thursday,  January 29. 6:30am
Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Library
1630 7th St, Washington DC 20001

Sephiri is an autistic boy who lives in a world of his own making, where he dwells among imagined sea creatures that help him process information in the “real world” in which he is forced to live. But lately he has been having dreams of a mysterious place, and he starts creating fantastical sketches of this strange, inner world.

Brenda, Sephiri’s mother, struggles with raising her challenged child alone. Her only wish is to connect with him—a smile on his face would be a triumph. Meanwhile, Sephiri’s father, Horus, is sentenced to life in prison, making life even lonelier for Brenda and Sephiri. Yet prison is still not enough to separate father and son. In the seventh year of his imprisonment and the height of his isolation, Horus develops supernatural mental abilities that allow him to reach his son. Memory and yearning carry him outside his body, and through the realities of their ordeals and dreamscape, Horus and Sephiri find each other—and find hope in ways never imagined.

Deftly portrayed by the remarkable and talented up-and-comer Morowa Yejidé, Time of the Locust is a brilliant narrative about the psychological realms of solitude, youth, and wonder. At its heart, this is a harrowing, surreal, and redemptive journey to the union of a family.

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Author Natalie Baszile in Atlanta Discussing Her Novel “Queen Sugar”

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Saturday,  January 31. 3:00pm
Hammonds House Museum
503 Peeples St SW
Atlanta, GA 30310

A mother-daughter story of reinvention—about an African American woman who unexpectedly inherits a sugarcane farm in Louisiana.

Why exactly her late father left her eight hundred acres of prime sugarcane land in Louisiana is as mysterious as it is generous. But for Charley Bordelon, it’s also an opportunity start over: to get away from the smog and sprawl of Los Angeles, and to grow a new life in the coffee-dark soil of the Gulf coast. Accompanied by her eleven-year-old daughter Micah, Charley arrives with high hopes and just in time for growing season.

Charley is as unfamiliar with Southern customs as she is with cane farming—which poses serious challenges both on and off the farm, especially when her farm manager leaves without warning. But, rolling up her sleeves and swallowing her pride, Charley finds the help of a colorful cast of characters—blood relatives and townspeople alike—who all become a family to her and Micah.

Natalie Baszile has a M.A. in Afro-American Studies from UCLA, and is a graduate of Warren Wilson College’s MFA Program for Writers. An early version of Queen Sugar won the Hurston Wright College Writer’s Award, was a co-runner up in the Faulkner Pirate’s Alley Novel-in-Progress.

A.D. and M.L. King: Two Brothers Who Dared to Dream

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Saturday, January 24. 2:00pm
MLK Memorial Library
901 G St, Washington, DC 20001

After nearly half a century; after their deaths, the lifelong saga of the relationship between MLK and his cherished brother A. D. King comes to light. They were sons, they were brothers. They were husbands. They were fathers. They were leaders. They played together, they preached together, they marched together. They dreamed together. They cried together, they prayed together. And they rejoiced together. Deep from the heartfelt memories of Mrs. Naomi Ruth Barber King comes a love story. This is a love story of a modern day Boaz and Ruth. It is a love story of brothers who lived and died for a dream. It is a legacy love story. It is a love for family and community. It is a love of a God who so loved the world that he gave His Only Begotten Son; a love that two brothers lived and died for; still daring to believe.

2015 African American Children’s Book Festival

Gymnasium of the Community College of Philadelphia
17th & Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, PA.

 

The Book Fair started out on a cold frosty day at John Wanamaker Department Store and is now one of the oldest and largest single day events for African American Children’s Books in the country. The success of the program is due to the fact that we offer the best and the brightest from the African American Children’s literary community. Parents, caregivers, and educators from the tri-state area are very supportive of the event. They all understand that children who read make more responsible decisions about their lifestyles.

The event is free and opened to the public.

Author and illustrators will make presentations from their books; also games, prizes, promotional give-aways and reading resources will be available. A wide selection of African American books to purchase will be featured at the event.